Cancer Ingress 2012 Newsletter

June 23, 2012 by  

After a very eventful Sun in Gemini period, here is the latest newsletter, published at Midsummer.

Table of Contents:

1. The Meaning of the Cancer Ingress
2. Mars-Saturn Conjunction in Libra, August 2012
3. What We Are Reading: Secrets of the Ancient Skies by Diana Rosenberg
4. Facebook Inc: The IPO Horoscope (involving monsters of the deep)
5. Cazimi: Are We Taking Liberties?
6. Babies, Babies Everywhere: Mia Farrow

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Transit of Venus across the Sun, June 5/6, 2012

June 6, 2012 by  

Yesterday, Venus moved across the face of the Sun, a conjunction not only in longitude, but also in declination. Venus was visible as a black dot on the Solar disc, moving diagonally across the Sun. The conjunction occurred with Venus in retrograde, and was exact at 15 Gemini.

Venus transiting the sun in pictures

Venus transiting the Sun – image courtesy of NASA

Last night, I had the opportunity to visit the Adler Planetarium here in Chicago, which held an observation event. The transit began at 5:04 pm CDT, and was visible until about 7:45 pm, when the Sun sank behind the skyline. There was also a live NASA feed from Mauna Kea, with commentary by astronomers and physicists. I got a chance to look through the high-tech observatory telescope, which was so clear that it showed the solar flares along with Venus herself, just as she made the mysterious black drop effect. This is the effect occurring when Venus separates from the corona of the Sun, and she looks more like a little drop than a clearly-defined sphere. The black drop effect has not yet been explained.

The viewing was a spectacular and special event, not to be repeated for another century. Even if you missed it, the good news is that Mercury transits the Sun about once a decade. Mercury is considerably smaller, however, so the visual is a little less dramatic, but still rare and beautiful.

I think of this transit as Venus being super-cazimi. Traditional sources say that planets are exceptionally strong when within 16′ of longitude of the Sun, as they are “in the heart of the Sun.” This condition is called “cazimi,” from the Arabic kasmimi. They are in the heart of the King, as it were, and so suitably powerful. Yet – and this will be a separate article on traditional astrological methods – a planet such as Venus is visually only in the heart of the Sun when she makes this super-rare transit. Could it be that cazimi only refers to these planetary transits across the Sun’s face? My few horary charts with cazimi planets indicate this may be the case.¬† Stay tuned.